Inside The Hunt For The Boston Bombers (2014) [Review]

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In April 2013, chaos erupted in Boston near the finish line of one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious marathons. It was the worst terrorist attack on the United States since 9/11 and led to one of the most extensive and public manhunts in American history. Now, as the one-year anniversary approaches, National Geographic Channel presents a special two-hour event, Inside the Hunt for the Boston Bombers.

A fairly detailed look at one of the worst events in recent US history. Combining both reenactments from those involved, live footage and interviews it provides a good overall view of what took place. It did at times seem like they were going through the motions of what happened in too much detail, not to the extent that it was unwatchable, but a dialogue not to dissimilar to this took place frequently; “we saw the guy had a white hat, so we called him white hat because he had a white hat, next to white hat was another guy who also had a hat on but this hat was not white, it was black, so we called him black hat.” It was like I was watching Nathan For You’s spoof documentary ‘Simon Sees‘ whenever they interviewed the FBI.

However, it is incredible that they found the bombers and some of the scenes are truly disturbing. It is a testament to spirit of the people of Boston, the length of which they went to and the level of co-operation they had with regards to lockdown that it is simply unknown if another city would react as cohesively as Boston did. It is truly disgusting what happened, unfortunately we live in a world where incidents like this do occur. You only need to look at what recently happened in France or the latest massacre in Nigeria (which is horrible that it can be referred to as the latest one), and get a shocking reminder of how sick some individuals can be.

Certain interviews and drawing it out to nearly 90 minutes (no adverts) diluted the impact that a documentary like this should have, but this is worth a watch. It is nothing revolutionary, but a startling presentation of a horrible act of violence.

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